Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications
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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 1

Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 2

Fly Ash A Solid Idea Lafarge A Solid Supplier! "Meet customer needs." It's such a business basic, yet so necessary for success. This is why Lafarge is a reliable source of supply. We've developed a company-wide sourcing system that transports product from areas with surpluses to those in need. Lafarge In addition to reliable product supply, has invested in over 225,000 tons our customers need reliable product of ash storage, hundreds of rail cars, performance. To meet this need, and dozens of pneumatic truck trailers. Lafarge has established a rigorous quality assurance program, rigid...

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 3

What is Fly Ash? Fly ash is an extremely fine powder consisting of spherical particles less than 50 microns in size. Fly ash is one of the construction industry's most commonly used pozzolans. Pozzolans are siliceous or siliceous/alumino materials possessing the ability to form cementitious compounds when mixed with lime [calcium hydroxide (CaOH)] and water. The word "pozzolan" is named after the small Italian town of Pozzuoli where some of the first hydraulic cements were created over 2000 years ago. The ancient Romans used volcanic ash as a pozzolan in their structures, some of which...

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 4

Where Does Fly Ash Come From? Fly ash is produced by coal-fired power plants during the combustion of coal. Fly ash consists mainly of inorganic glassy particles formed from the mineral matter in the coal. During combustion, these minerals are heated to a molten state and chemically combined and solidified while suspended in the exhaust gas. They are then collected by electrostatic precipitators or bag houses. Fly ash is classified based on the chemical and physical composition of the ash. Self-cementing fly ash is normally produced from lignite or sub-bituminous coal that meets the...

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 5

for Mitigating Shrink/Swell Properties in Expansive Clay Soils Applications In soils containing expansive clays, fluctuations in moisture content can change the soil volume by as much as 20 percent. If this volume change is not controlled, premature failure can occur to the overlaying structures. Basic Use Self-cementing fly ash can be successfully used for the treatment of clay soils Typically, contractors utilize two solutions to the expansive clay problem: replace the clay with more stable fill or treat with a lime-containing material. A third approach uses self-cementing fly ash to...

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 6

for Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) Pavement Recycling Basic Use Deteriorated asphalt The use of self-cementing fly ash in recycled asphalt pavements is a very attractive alternative for state departments of transportation (DOTs), county engineers and commercial owners wanting to upgrade the performance and durability of their pavements and parking lots. Many counties and most paving contractors have pulvamixers and other equipment required to complete HMA recycling projects. pavements can be effectively and economically rehabilitated using selfcementing fly ash as a strength-enhancing agent....

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 7

for Structural Fill Applications Applications Basic Use Self-cementing fly ash is an effective and economical material for the construction of engineered structural fill projects, building sites and foundations, levees and dikes, embankments for highways, railroads and other public works requiring a compacted fill material. The use of coal combustion products (CCPs), such as self-cementing fly ash and bottom ashes, for structural fills is becoming more prevalent due to the decreased supply and increased cost of virgin fill materials. Transportation of these materials to a remote project...

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 8

for Stabilizing Aggregate Bases Basic Use Stabilized aggregate bases The stabilization of aggregate bases has many benefits. The supply of high-quality aggregates for road base construction continues to diminish in many communities, while new reserves are increasingly more difficult to permit due to zoning and environmental regulations. Sometimes quality aggregates have to be transported long distances, resulting in high construction costs. Using self-cementing fly ash to stabilize poor quality aggregates is often a cost-effective solution. The cementing of the aggregate particles increases...

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 9

for Soil Stabilization Applications Self-cementing fly ash has been used for over 20 years for the stabilization of soils. Because self-cementing fly ash is cementitious, it can be used in many soil stabilization applications as a stand alone material. Basic Use Self-cementing fly ash has been used effectively for increasing the subgrade support capacity of pavements and for increasing the shear strengths of soils in embankment sections. In addition to providing additional subgrade support, the self-cementing fly ash stabilized area provides a more stable section for paving operations and...

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 10

for Soil Drying Basic Use The use of self-cementing fly ash to dry soils is an economical alternative to traditional methods. Structures must be constructed on stable soils. For a soil to be stable it must be compacted to its maximum practical density. Because of the relationship between a soil's density and water content, the moisture content of the soil must be tightly controlled. If a soil is on the dry side of optimum for maximum density, the solution is simple. The contractor simply adds water until the soil's moisture content is close to optimum, usually specified to be 95% of...

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Self-Cementing Fly Ash in Geotechnical Applications - 12

Company Profile Lafarge North America is part of the Lafarge Group. The world leader Please contact your Lafarge Office for specific product information, availability and ordering. Lakes and Seaway Business Unit Bingham Farms, Michigan Phone: 248-594-1991 U.S. East Business Unit Alpharetta, Georgia Phone: 678-746-2000 River Business Unit Lee’s Summit, Missouri Phone: 816-251-2100 Western Business Unit Calgary, Alberta Phone: 403-271-9110 in building materials, active on five continents, the Lafarge Group holds top-ranking positions in all four of its divisions – Lafarge North America Cement...

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